Keough School of Global Affairs Opens

Ksga Master Degree Class

Renée LaReau | August 25, 2017

The Donald R. Keough School of Global Affairs, Notre Dame’s first new school in nearly a century, has opened its doors to Notre Dame and the world.
 
Housed in the newly completed Jenkins Hall, the Keough School now enrolls 38 students in its new master of global affairs program. The students come from 21 countries and bring a wealth of professional experience in international development, education, peacebuilding, environmental conservation, human rights, humanitarian assistance, journalism and other fields.
 
While engaged with a curriculum that includes foundational courses in economics and integral human development, the academic cornerstone of the Keough School, students choose a concentration in international development, international peace studies or global affairs. A global policy seminar brings students together with influential policymakers from around the world, and a theory-to-practice Integration Lab (i-Lab) prepares them to address real-world global challenges.
 
Students are taught by a diverse array of faculty with expertise in development economics, comparative regional and international politics, peacebuilding, human rights, global religions, social ethics, international trade and development practice. The School’s Global Policy Initiative brings prominent policymakers to campus and will later provide educational programs and professional opportunities for Notre Dame graduate students and undergraduates in Washington, D.C.
 
The Keough School brings together nine international units focused on international research, scholarship and education at Notre Dame: the Ansari Institute for Global Engagement with Religion, the Center for Civil and Human Rights, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, the Liu Institute for Asia & and Asian Studies, the McKenna Center for Human Development and Global Business, the Nanovic Institute for European Studies and the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development.

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 by Daily Domer Staff

Posted In: Features